Software

The software we use and recommend is almost exclusively Free Open Source Software (FOSS). Almost, because almost all of it is available in a free (as in beer) version, and a commercial version that may contain some additional features that are not licenced under a FOSS licence. And sometimes the best software is not Open Source. 

Now, I'm guessing some of you are wondering what all that means. If you aren't, you can probably skip the next few bits.

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As many in the business, education and government sectors wring their hands over the impending demise of Microsoft's venerable Windows XP operating system, the IT media is offering helpful advice on moving to the more recent MS operating system, Windows 7. Some even boldly suggest moving straight to Windows 8.1.Perhaps some Windows XP users wonder whether there's a way to avoid facing this same predicament when Windows 7 or 8.1 is similarly 'end-of-lifed' by the shrewd strategists at Microsoft - rest assured they won't let this one drag on as long as XP has.Some XP users might even consider stepping off the upgrade treadmill altogether - platform migrations are costly, disruptive, and risky. This migration is being driven by Microsoft, not XP users' best interest.

The problems with proprietary formats. 

Reports emerged this week of a problem for Apple users opening presentation files created in Keynote. The latest update of Keynote -- in fact, all of iWork '13 -- won't open files created with versions before iWork '09, instead prompting users to find a copy of iWork '09 and open the file with that.

Good talk about software development and the two main models - the Cathedral and the Bazaar.

Professor Mark Apperley from University of Waikato tweezers out the silicon chips to expose how computers switch us on ... the increasing popularity of 'Open Source' software development.

Eric S Raymond's influential essay (and later book) comparing the software development models of closed source proprietary software (the Cathedral) and open source software (the Bazaar).

Ironically, competitive advantage now is not merely a matter of finding the best ideas, but rather managing the flow of all the brilliant solutions pressing to find a way into organizations.

News

As many in the business, education and government sectors wring their hands over the impending demise of Microsoft's venerable Windows XP operating system, the IT media is offering helpful advice on moving to the more recent MS operating system, Windows 7. Some even boldly suggest moving straight to Windows 8.1.Perhaps some Windows XP users wonder whether there's a way to avoid facing this same predicament when Windows 7 or 8.1 is similarly 'end-of-lifed' by the shrewd strategists at Microsoft - rest assured they won't let this one drag on as long as XP has.Some XP users might even consider stepping off the upgrade treadmill altogether - platform migrations are costly, disruptive, and risky. This migration is being driven by Microsoft, not XP users' best interest.

The problems with proprietary formats. 

Reports emerged this week of a problem for Apple users opening presentation files created in Keynote. The latest update of Keynote -- in fact, all of iWork '13 -- won't open files created with versions before iWork '09, instead prompting users to find a copy of iWork '09 and open the file with that.

Good talk about software development and the two main models - the Cathedral and the Bazaar.

Professor Mark Apperley from University of Waikato tweezers out the silicon chips to expose how computers switch us on ... the increasing popularity of 'Open Source' software development.

March 06, 2014, 12:01 AM — The Linux Foundation will offer a Linux development course on edX, the massive open online course (MOOC) platform developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University. The move is part of an edX effort, announced Thursday, to expand its course offerings to include content from nonacademic institutions. All edX content previously came from the nonprofit's 32 member schools, which include the University of California, Berkeley; Dartmouth College and McGill University.

Eric S Raymond's influential essay (and later book) comparing the software development models of closed source proprietary software (the Cathedral) and open source software (the Bazaar).